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Changing Trends in UK




By Samuel Hary

The phenomenon of online retailing is catching up in the United Kingdom like wild fire as in 2005 consumers in UK bought goods worth £8.2 billion from various marketing web portals. This figure is up by 29% from the online sales achieved by portals in the year previous to this, states market analysis firm Verdict.

Now the Royal Mail has come out with a survey which actually reveals that, which section or class is driving this section of the market. According to this survey, consumers in the UK spent an average of £609 online so far this year (end of September) with the biggest online spenders being Scots. The Scottish consumers have reportedly spent £701 this year on online-shopping, up 74 from their counterparts in Manchester and a whopping £152 pounds ahead of those dwelling in the South-West. Roughly an average Brit has spent a little more than £600 this year but with Christmas coming up, this figure might try to lunge and touch the £1000 mark.

The age group survey doesn't throw as many surprises as it is the 45-54 year olds, who are shedding 'pounds' from their fat wallets. This group has spent an average of £724, which seems fair enough as more often than not, people in their middle age are generally live a financially secure life.

Platforms offering maximum choice of retailers are expected to cash in on this boom, even when they are supposed to offer 'cashback'. The Interact Media in Retail Group has predicted that the online retail market will grow 36% to £26 billion this year and the UK shoppers have already spent £13.5 billion online during the first half of 2006. So these estimates are very much on the mark and it shows that the UK buyers have earmarked the 'high-street' as a No-Entry zone.
 
 
About the Author
Samuel Hary writes on online retailing at http://www.ukonlinemarket.co.uk

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