Article Categories
» Arts & Entertainment
» Automotive
» Business
» Careers & Jobs
» Education & Reference
» Finance
» Food & Drink
» Health & Fitness
» Home & Family
» Internet & Online Businesses
» Miscellaneous
» Self Improvement
» Shopping
» Society & News
» Sports & Recreation
» Technology
» Travel & Leisure
» Writing & Speaking

  Listed Article

  Category: Articles » Technology » Multimedia » Article

Is the Record Album Dead? Not by a Long Shot.

By Charles Essmeier

In 1982, Sony and Philips introduced the compact disc, a digital music playback format that used a laser to read the disc. The compact disc was expected to quickly replace the long play record album (LP) that Columbia had introduced in 1949. The product took off quickly, even at a retail price that was nearly double that of a record album, and sales of record albums plummeted. The CD, as compact discs quickly became known, offered what audio magazines called “perfect sound forever” while offering immunity to the effects of the wear and tear that often left records noisy. The record companies reduced the price of manufacture through improved production methods, and the cost of manufacturing a CD soon fell below that of manufacturing a record. Even so, compact discs continued to sell well at the higher price, making the CD quite a profitable product, indeed.

In order to maximize their profits, the record companies decided to phase out the phonograph record. They told their retailers that they would no longer accept returns on defective albums. This caused many retailers to stop stocking records altogether, and the record album had more or less disappeared from the market by 1990. And then something strange happened. The record began to make a comeback. Sparked by a few artists that demanded that their record companies issue their product in record form, the LP never quite went away. New albums by bands such as Pink Floyd and Metallica were issued in the mid-1990’s in LP form, and those releases not only sold out, but now command a hefty premium on the collector’s market. A number of independent bands that were signed by small record companies began to issue records in addition to CDs, partly just to be “different” and partly because the band members just liked listening to records. In some cases, in order to spur sales of the record, artists would include an extra song or two on the record that was not included on the compact disc of the same album. Throughout the 1990’s and to the present day, several million record albums have been sold every year.

Granted, records are harder to find in stores than they were fifteen years ago, and an interested buyer might have to seek out a collector’s shop or buy them online. But new albums by major and minor artists, along with older, “classic” albums, continue to be released in the LP format. Last year, in Japan, EMI Records issued every album by the Beatles in LP form as limited edition items. They sold out quickly, even at nearly $500 for the set. The market for records is smaller than it used to be, but the record album still thrives.
About the Author
©Copyright 2005 by Retro Marketing. Charles Essmeier is the owner of Retro Marketing, a firm that operates several retail Websites, including, a site devoted to vintage aluminum Christmas trees and accessories, and, a site devoted to rare records, compact discs and by the band Pink Floyd.

Article Source:
If you wish to add the above article to your website or newsletters then please include the "Article Source:" as shown above and make it hyperlinked.

  Some other articles by Charles Essmeier
Website Promotion - Writing Articles Generates Traffic Four Different Ways
There are many different ways to promote your Website in order to generate traffic. Most of them cost money, but one of the most effective techniques is free ...

Website Promotion - Submit Articles, but Spread them Around
Writing articles on topics that are relevant to your Website’s topic and submitting them to free content sites is a great way to effectively ...

Why Do Music Lovers Still Prefer to Buy Records?
In the late 1940’s, the 45-RPM record replaced the 78-RPM record. The 45 was smaller, less breakable and could be made and sold more cheaply. Despite these advantages, ...

  Recent Articles
The iPod Shuffle
by Thomas Manning

Selecting a Portable Yamada DVD Player
by Jason Flowers has developed a new Quick Podcast service
by Tomas Sazkoks

Effective Digital Recording
by heera

Video Projectors: Info You Should Know
by Julia Hall

Video Editing Magic
by Anna Josephs

Stop Burning Bridges…Or Your Career Might Go Up In Flames!
by Sheena Metal

Every Song Tells A Story…But Does It Need To Be An Abstract Novel?
by Sheena Metal

Ellio's Rock Star Challenge: The Online Teen Battle of the Bands
by Elizabeth Lawrence

Online Digital Imaging
by Ben Padnos

Music Subscription Service
by Chris Young

HDTV Introduction
by David Z

How To Submit Network News Video Clip Footage In 3 Steps
by Aaron Benbaruch

10 Tips for Telling GREAT Video Stories
by Brien Lee

Madonna Confesses Dance Floor Tour May Be Coming
by Rita R. Powers